Bushnell Forge Review – 2022 Guide

| Last Updated: June 2, 2021

Mostly known for their affordable and entry-level scopes. Bushnell also has some high-end scopes to offer. A very praised and impressive line of scopes from their inventory is the Bushnell Forge series.

And we’ll specifically be talking about the Forge 4.5-27x50 here. 

IMAGEPRODUCT
  • Package includes sunshade, flip cover, and tools
  • 4.5-27x magnification with a 50 mm objective lens
  • HDOS multi-coated lenses with EXO barrier coating
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Bushnell Forge 4.5-27x50mm

Pros

  • Exceptional Clarity From Lenses and Durable Design
  • Deploy Reticle is Very Detailed for Adjustments
  • Turrets With Zero Stop and Power Lever for Magnification

Cons

  • Non-illuminated Scope
  • Throw Lever is Not Removable

Bushnell Forge Specs

This Bushnell forge is a 4.5-27x scope that is offered in Mil or MOA deploy reticle options. You can also opt for an FFP or SFP variant. However, choosing the FFP will be a better choice for the price. 

  • Eye Relief: 4 inch

  • Adjustment Options (Parallax, windage, elevation): W/E - 60 MOA with ¼ MOA (for MOA variant scope). Parallax - 25 yards to infinity

  • Type of Reticle: Deploy

  • Image of Reticle:

  • Magnification: 4.5 - 27 x

  • Focal Plane: FFP or SFP

  • Objective Lens: 50 mm

  • Field of View: 21.6 - 3.5 ft at 100 yds

Pros

The Forge 4.5-27x scope is among the top of the line scopes from Bushnell. It has been meticulously designed to suit the requirements of pro shooters while also keeping the price accessible to entry-level learners of the long-distance shooting trade. 

Deploy Reticle is Very Detailed for Adjustments

The Forge scope features the famous Deploy reticle. This reticle has been created to suit long range uses without requiring the shooter to use turrets very often. You are offered the option to choose between an MOA or Mil reticle. However, if you opt for the terrain color you’ll only get the MOA reticle. 

The reticle is offered in SFP or FFP variants. But since it is a long-range scope, let’s stick to the FFP. It has dots for quick reference and fine hash marks with short 1 MOA and long 5 MOA lines. At maximum magnification of 27x, you can see up to 22 MOA at the bottom of the viewable area in the reticle. 

Turrets With Zero Stop and Power Lever for Magnification

The scope comes with a pre-installed power change lever on the magnification ring. This helps with quick power adjustments without needing to pull your eye away from the scope. Talking about the turrets, they feature very detailed markings for adjustments and are very crisp to operate. That mushiness found on many turrets is absolutely out of the question. 

The revlimited zero stop takes seconds to set and allows instant zeroing. The turrets are finger adjustable and use a lift-set and press-lock mechanism. The side focus parallax knob offers adjustment from 25 yards to infinity. Which is optimal since the minimum magnification of this scope is 4.5x. 

Exceptional Clarity From Lenses and Durable Design

The Forge has HDOS fully multicoated optics that also feature an EXO barrier coating. This coating is hydrophobic and also repels solvents. The scope is also IPX7 rated and fully submersible in 3 feet of water for 30 minutes. 

Cons

The Forge may be a flawless design, but it also has a few drawbacks. These can be mere considerations or a no-go signal depending upon what you’re looking for. Let’s traverse through them. 

Throw Lever is Not Removable

A very minor issue that can be an initial issue for some people is the fixed power lever. This lever comes installed from the factory and is not removable. While many people don’t really mind it being fixed there. Some may have a problem with that. 

Non-illuminated Scope

With the price of the Mil reticle variant touching about $1000 dollars, an illuminated reticle would have extended the range of applications for this scope. It will be used for long-range precision shooting and also hunting. An illuminated reticle is an unwavering necessity for some people. 

Best Uses For the Bushnell Forges

As it can already be inferred from the specs and design of this scope. The Bushnell Forge is best suited for long-range precision shooting. That can be competitions, hunting, or bench rest shooting. 

If you choose the scope with an FFP reticle, you’ll find it very useful for quick adjustments especially when shooting over a long-range. The deploy reticle is very useful for that. However, the windage elevations are not very useful sometimes and you have to rely upon Kentucky windage. But that’s just occasional and depends upon what distances or type of target (stationary or moving) you are shooting at. 

Some long-range users prefer using Mil reticles rather than MOA. And luckily you have the option to choose from either of those in the variant you choose. 

Talking about hunting, this scope will allow you to hunt big and small game, stationary, or moving critters at almost any range you deem fit. The lack of illumination can be a small drawback in certain situations (including tactical applications). But the objective is still big enough and the lens multi-coated to patch through a good amount of light for bright images. 

Is the Bushnell Forge Compatible With Any Rifle?

As far as usage statistics confirm. The Bushnell forge 4.5-27x has performed best with 6.5 caliber rifles. It is a long-range scope with an FFP non-illuminated reticle and will suit medium to heavy-caliber bolt action and semi-auto rifles. The scope will not suit very lightweight rifles like the .17HMR and also assault and short barrel rifles. 

What Do I Need to Know About Mounting the Bushnell Forge?

The Forge comes with almost everything you need for mounting, except the mounts. The scope will use a good sturdy pair of scope rings rather than a single scope mount due to its already heavy weight. 

The package includes a sunshade, flip covers, an Allen key, and a multitool to help you install/remove the mount. The 2-inch sunshade is a useful inclusion since the scope is non-illuminated and will mostly be used in broad daylight. 

The power lever is a useful addition, but cannot be removed. So you’ll have to live with that. 

What Makes the Bushnell Forges Stand Out From the Competition?

There are several factors that make the Bushnell Forge an outstanding scope. First is the Deploy reticle that helps with quick and easy trajectory estimations. Since it is an FFP scope, the reticle helps with long-range shooting without adjusting the turrets every now and then. 

One very interesting feature differentiating it from the competition is the EXO barrier coating on the lens. Which offers exceptional resistance against water, fog, and any other contaminants that could hamper the vision. 

Bushnell Forge vs Vortex Viper - Comparison Overview 

Both Bushnell and Vortex are respectable competitors on the riflescope market. The Forge from Bushnell and the Viper from Vortex are amazing scopes for their price. 

The Viper costs a bit more than the Forge in similar magnifications, but the glass quality is equally comparable between the two. 

Vortex Viper is also a winner in terms of warranty compared to the Forge. Since it has a lifetime warranty which covers damages from normal use. Whereas the Forge is only covered for manufacturing and workmanship defects. 

Both these scopes are almost alike in performance. Plus, each of these has its own fanbase. However, after a close comparison, the Vortex Viper range was found to be more rugged than the Bushnell Forge. But the Forge had a better reticle and the EXO coating on the lenses was another winning factor. 

The Bushnell Forge offers better value for money at what it is priced at. But the Vortex is more suited for seasoned and pro shooters. Plus people will use a scope for tactical uses and not just hunting or competitions. 

Conclusion

The Bushnell Forge 4.5-27x is a long-range scope with an FFP Deploy reticle, mutilated lenses with EXO coating, and a durable water-resistant body. The scope has been priced right and delivers exceptional clarity and performance for extreme precision applications. 

People Also Ask

Check out the definitive answers to your queries about the Bushnell Engage scope. Including info on warranty, low light use, manufacturing location, and much more. 

What Kind of Warranty Does the Bushnell Forge Come With?

The Bushnell Forge is covered by a Bushnell Ironclad warranty. This is a lifetime warranty and covers all manufacturing and workmanship defects in the scope. The lifetime refers to a period of 30 years.

The warranty is transferable to every new owner of the scope and doesn’t require any purchase receipt. 

How Much Does the Bushnell Forge Weigh?

The Bushnell Forge weighs 29.9 ounces or 1.86 pounds or 848 grams. The scope leans a bit on the heavy side so you’ll need a sturdy pair of rings to mount it on your rifle.

Can You Use Bushnell Forge in Low Light?

Yes. The Bushnell Forge can work well in low light to some extent. The lack of an illuminated reticle is a small deterrent. But the 50 mm objective and multi-coated lenses still offer an acceptable shooting experience. 

How Long Does the Battery Last on the Bushnell Forge?

The Bushnell Forge 4.5-27x is a non-illuminated scope and does not use a battery. However, other variants in the Bushnell Forge line of scopes feature the option for an illuminated reticle. 

Are Bushnell Forge Scopes Any Good?

The Bushnell Forge is an amazing scope for the price. The image clarity is what you’d expect from a high priced Nightforce or Schmidt and Bender scope. At less than half of their price. 

Where is the Bushnell Forge Made?

While many Bushnell scopes are manufactured in Japan and the Philippines, the Forge series of scopes are manufactured in China. But with exceptional precision and very comprehensive quality check from Bushnell. 



Ankit Kumar is an engineer turned writer who specializes in topics related to firearms, gun safety and weapon tech. His passion towards enrolling in the Army drifted his interest towards light and heavy firearms. He’s a qualified competitive air rifle shooter and an avid nature lover. His other areas of expertise include survival, prepping and firearms/ammo storage. When he’s not writing, he’s either learning a new skill, trekking or enjoying a long drive.