Vortex Crossfire II 6-24X50 Review – 2022 Report

| Last Updated: June 27, 2021

The Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50 is one of the second generation Crossfire riflescopes made by Vortex. It is ideal for medium to long-distance shots, having a magnification range between 6 and 24x.

The Crossfire II 6 24x50 is best for medium and long-range hunting and sharpshooting because of its magnification and accuracy adjustability.

IMAGEPRODUCT
  • Best range long range scope with amazing clarity
  • Generous 4 inches eye relief and good field of view
  • Dead hold BDC reticle & 10 yds to infinity parallax
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Vortex Crossfire II 6-24x50mm

Pros

  • 4” eye relief is safe and effective
  • Durable design of the scope means a longer lifespan
  • 10 yards to infinity parallax makes it easy to stay focused
  • Variable magnification up to 24x

Cons

  • Does not include mounting rings
  • No brightness adjustability means difficulty in low light

Vortex Crossfire II 6-24X50 Specs

Eye Relief: 4 inches

Adjustment Options: ¼ MOA per click

Parallax: 10 yards to infinity

Windage: 40 yards

Elevation: 40 yards

Type of Reticle: Dead-Hold BDC reticle

Magnification: 6-24x

Focal Plane: Second Focal Plane

Objective Lens: 50mm

Field of View: 4.4 to 17.3 linear feet at 100 yards

Pros

At an affordable price, the Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50 has a large number of features that make it popular among hunters of all experience levels.

10 Yards to Infinity Parallax Makes it Easy to Stay Focused

If you’re unfamiliar with parallax or not sure why it’s important, we’ll break it down.

Parallax is an optical illusion that can occur when moving your head away from a lens after you have focused on a target through the lens. Ultimately, it can cause you to make unnecessary adjustments based on the illusion that the reticle has moved off of the target when you moved your head away from the lens. 

The 10 yards to infinity parallax allows the parallax of the Crossfire II 6 24x50 to be adjusted beginning at 10 yards. Adjusting the parallax allows you to keep this from happening, and with a parallax adjustment beginning at 10 yards, you can prevent this at any range.

Variable Magnification up to 24x Means You Can Take Longer Shots

The magnification of the Crossfire II 6 24x50 allows the riflescope to be successful at medium to long-range shots. The standard 6x magnification means that when you look through the lens of the scope, the target is magnified at 6x, which is standard for this scope. The magnification increases to 24x, making long-range target shooting and hunting possible with the Crossfire II 6 24x50.

6x magnification is favorable among hunters because it magnifies the target to a size that is easy to see through the reticle without losing sight of the target if it moves.

With 6x standard magnification, you likely won’t have to make any adjustments to the magnification on shots that are less than 500 yards away.

24x magnification means you can take longer shots than you would with scopes that have less magnification. This is ideal for long-range shots up to 1,000 yards, including target practice and big game hunting. Trying to focus on a small object at 24x magnification can be difficult as the target can move just slightly and cause you to lose sight of it through the lens.

4” Eye Relief is Safe and Effective

The eye relief of the Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50 is 4 inches. This means you can keep your eye 4 inches away from the scope's ocular lens while still maintaining a clear vision of the target through the reticle.

You should never press your eye directly onto the ocular lens of the scope, as the recoil of the firearm will cause the scope to hit your eye, face, or head. The longer the eye relief (in this case, 4 inches), the bigger the distance you can keep between your eye and the lens while shooting, ultimately preventing the scope from hitting you during the recoil.

Durable Design of the Scope Means a Longer Lifespan

The Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50 is made of aircraft-grade aluminum and is fog-proof, waterproof, and shock-proof. It is designed to withstand the elements of the outdoors, including being dropped or hit against a hard surface, without breaking.

If for any reason, the Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50 breaks and is unable to be used, Vortex will issue you a full unit replacement as part of their lifetime warranty.

Cons

Unfortunately, there are a couple of cons that accompany the Vortex Crossfire II 6-24x50. Knowing them ahead of time can help you make adjustments or preparations when using the scope.

No Brightness Adjustability Means Difficulty in Low Light

The Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50 is only available with a Dead-Hold BDC reticle, making it incompatible with low light conditions

The good news is that the riflescope lenses are coated to prevent color distortion and help increase the clarity of the target when looking in dim conditions, but it is not the riflescope you would want to use in low light conditions.

Does Not Include Mounting Rings

The Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50 does not come with the mounting rings that it will need to mount the scope to the rifle, so you will have to make this purchase separately before mounting the scope to your rifle.

Best Uses For the Vortex Crossfire II 6-24X50

The Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50 is best used for practicing sharpshooting, long-distance target practice, and hunting big game at potentially long distances. The Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50 is not the riflescope you would want to add if you plan on doing short-range target practice or hunting.

Below, we’ve explained in further detail just how magnification, yardage, and MOA plays a part in using the Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50.

How Does Magnification Play a Role in Using the Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50?

The magnification of the Crossfire II 6 24x50 is standard at 6x magnification as soon as you look through the scope. The scope magnifies to 24x intensity, which allows you to take a shot up to 1,000 yards away.

This is why the Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50 riflescope is best for those who will be practicing sharpshooting or taking long-range shots.

What is Yardage and How Does it Play a Role in Using the Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50?

Two points that are 1/60th of a degree apart are considered to have a one minute of angle difference between them, and one minute of angle is equivalent to a one-inch difference in distance between these two points for every 100 yards.

When shooting a target more than 100 yards, your bullet will slow down the further it flies through the air. A slower bullet will fall faster, which is why a 500-yard shot can have a significant drop in bullet elevation as compared to the drop at a 200-yard shot.

To make up for this drop, you need to adjust your scope to allow the bullet to drop at the intended target, not several inches too low.

To adjust for this drop, you will adjust the MOA on your scope.

The Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50 allows you to make ¼ MOA adjustments to both windage and elevation. This allows you to dial in the exact MOA for the distance you are shooting, with the maximum MOA for both elevation and windage being 40 yards.

Is the Vortex Crossfire II 6-24X50 Hard to Use?

The Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50 can be difficult for someone who is not used to shooting through a riflescope that has intense magnification. Even the standard 6x magnification is nearly the same as the maximum magnification of some riflescopes. This can be difficult for the shooter to get used to.

Also, it is a second focal plane (SFP) scope, so this can be tricky to get used to if you have been using an FFP scope. The reticle size on an SFP scope will stay the same no matter the magnification, while the reticle of an FFP scope will increase as the magnification increases. If you’re not used to the reticle staying the same size during magnification, this can be something you will need to get used to seeing on the scope. 

If you are a shooter who is accustomed to making long-range shots, especially with an SFP scope, you should have no problem sighting in your Crossfire II.

Is the Vortex Crossfire II 6-24X50 Compatible With Any Rifle?

Yes, you can mount the Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50 to any rifle as long as you have a set of 30mm rings. You will have to purchase the 30mm rings separately to secure the Crossfire II to your rifle mount.

We recommend using the Vortex Crossfire II on the centerfire rifle that you will be using to make long-distance shots.

What Do I Need to Know About Mounting the Vortex Crossfire II 6-24X50?

You will need to purchase a set of 30mm mounting rings to mount the Crossfire II 6 24x50 to your rifle mount. These are not included with the riflescope and will need to be purchased separately.

Make sure you mount the rings using the lowest height setting of the rings so that you can get the most accurate view possible.

What Makes the Vortex Crossfire II 6-24X50 Stand Out From the Competition?

Hands down, the cost of the Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50 is what attracts us to this long-range entry-level scope. It is the perfect scope for those who are learning how to better their long-range shooting game, and you get a nice set of features included with the scope. This makes the Crossfire II a step above the competition.

Comparison Overview

Vortex Copperhead vs Crossfire II

The Vortex Copperhead has a lower magnification of 4x standard to 12x maximum (or 3-9x). This is a beneficial feature only if the magnification intensity of the Crossfire II 6 24x50 is too much for you. However, if you plan to improve your long-range game, you need to stick with the Crossfire II 6 24x50, as it will give you the magnification options you need to practice your long-range shots.

The Copperhead also has a 44mm objective lens, while the Crossfire II has a large 50mm objective lens. The parallax of the Copperhead is also less adjustable, allowing you to change it at 100 yards rather than the 10 yards to infinity that’s available on the Crossfire II.

All in all, the Crossfire II is the better scope of the two.

Vortex Crossfire II vs Nikon Prostaff

Like the Copperhead, the Nikon Prostaff only has magnification at 4x standard and 12x maximum. This won’t help you if you are trying to improve your long-distance game.

The slight advantage that the Nikon Prostaff has over the Vortex Crossfire II is in the reticle design. The Nikon Prostaff has a metallic sheen in the reticle, making it appear brighter or more visible than the standard black lines and hash marks on the BDC reticle.

They are both good riflescopes for the money, with the advantage of going to the Crossfire II because of its magnification.

Conclusion

If you need a top-rated riflescope to add to your rifle for long-range practicing and hunting, you can’t go wrong with the Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50. It has excellent parallax adjustability, crisp target clarity, and a large 4” eye relief. For the money, we recommend the Vortex Crossfire 6 24x50 to those who are wanting to try their luck at hitting long-range targets.

People Also Ask

You may still have questions, and we are here to help! Review our short FAQ below to find answers to some of the more commonly asked questions.

What Kind of Warranty Does the Vortex Crossfire II 6-24X50 Come With?

The Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50 comes with a lifetime warranty. This ensures that Vortex will fully repair or replace your unit if it breaks or becomes defective.

How Much Does the Vortex Crossfire II 6-24X50 Weigh?

The Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50 weighs 23.6 ounces, making it a relatively lightweight riflescope for the quality scope it is.

Can You Use Vortex Crossfire II 6-24X50 in Low Light?

The Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50 is not recommended in low light conditions because it does not have any illumination or brightness capabilities. The lenses of the riflescope have a coating that helps the clarity of the target in dim conditions, but that is as far as the low light capabilities go.

How Long Does the Battery Last on the Vortex Crossfire II 6-24X50?

The battery (CR 2032) of the Vortex Crossfire II 6 24x50 lasts for approximately 150 hours.



Josh Lewis the managing editor at Gun Mann and when he isn't writing about guns he is more than likely tinkering with them. He also enjoys hunting, fishing and spending time outdoors. As a lifelong gun owner he knows his stuff!